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Police Diplomacy - Text version for translation
Sep 2, 2010

 

 

Police Diplomacy: A Global Trust

 

 
Police Diplomacy Defined

Police Diplomacy: A Global Trust is the interchange of policing resources, training, and experience between nations to enhance public participation and provide a safer, more secure community regardless of geopolitical borders.


Diplomatic relationships have long been the foundations of trust between nations. In fact, a key component of civilian diplomats work is the cross-border exchange of political, religious and cultural values. Law enforcement agencies from different countries can do this by exchanging best-practice law enforcement procedures. The results will be the same: Gaining a better understanding of each region’s particular challenges, while reducing mistrust and providing a higher level of public safety.

An essential component of this process involves moving from a closed system to an inclusive and open system of public participation in the public safety mission.

 

A Message from the Sheriff of Los Angeles County


The theory and practice of police diplomacy is a natural extension of what I call public trust policing; policework that incorporates and encourages public participation in an otherwise closed system.

Police diplomacy, simply put, is a police exchange program where law enforcement from different countries cross-train, and share resources and experience to enhance each regions’ public safety. America does not have a nationwide police force. What it does have though, are 19,000 sheriffs and police departments willing and able to offer expertise in law enforcement techniques and tactics successfully implemented here in the United States.


I have traveled extensively across this great planet of ours. I have spoken with leaders and followers alike, and what I’ve learned is that all cultures are desirous of peaceful relations. Law enforcement must play a vital role in achieving such harmony. This may sound a bit naïve, but I assure you it is not.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department has developed exchange programs with our international neighbors for over a decade. We have trained and been trained by countries on all continents. This training has involved urban policing tactics, intervention and preventative techniques as well as technology sharing in the fight to combat global terrorism.


The central ingredient in all of this is the participation of the public. They want to be included and must be included if we are to succeed in providing quality public safety to each and every region in the world community.


Sheriff Leroy D. Baca


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Develop Methods of Global Participation

Executive Leadership Academy


The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) developed a four week training program at the request of Genaro Garcia-Luna, the Mexican Secretariat of Public Security. The first session began in September 2008 at the LASD Academy. The coursework emphasized leadership, ethics, internal accountability, risk management, public trust, independent oversight, human dignity, and community policing.


This academy is part of the effort by the Mexican Secretariat of Public Security to reform the police by improving management and leadership skills through training. This is the first FBI / local law enforcement agency partnership effort to work closely with the Mexican federal police to create and implement this type of training. 


Central American Law Enforcement Exchange Program (CALEE)


The Law Enforcement Exchange Program was developed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and the Los Angeles Police Department. The goal is to combine the expertise, resources, and jurisdiction of local, state, federal, and international law enforcement involved in investigating and countering transnational criminal activity into a single, focused coalition to maximize intelligence, operational effectiveness, and prosecution potential.
 

During 2008 this program sent sheriff’s deputies to El Salvador to work side-by-side with officers to mentor and teach various methods of investigating gang crimes. In 2009, sheriff’s deputies working with officers from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and the Fairfax, Virginia Task Force came together to share techniques and practices in fighting transnational gang crime. Additional exchanges with Nicaragua and Panama continue to expand the combined efforts of peace officers of many nations.


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International Partnerships for Tactical Operations Training Exchange


The LASD Special Enforcement Bureau (SEB) has a long history of interrelationships and training exchange with command and tactical personnel from other domestic law enforcement agencies, the U.S. military, and law enforcement partners from the international community. In recent years, SEB (which includes Special Weapons and Tactics, SWAT) has hosted extensive training programs for the Police Force of the Slovak Republic, the Interior Security Forces of Qatar, Royal Jordanian Special Operations personnel, and the German Police Special Forces (SEK). During these exchanges, team personnel from both sides gain valuable insight in areas such as tactics, equipment and emerging technologies.


Sharing Police Safety Equipment with our Global Policing Partners
 

Safety equipment is important to police officers throughout the world. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and government officials recognize that as new equipment is issued to sheriff’s deputies, recently outdated equipment in Los Angeles can still be of great value to police officers in other countries. Donations made have included holsters, helmets, gun belts, ballistic vests, batons and patrol cars to police authorities in Mexico and Thailand, vests to police in Iraq, and more. By working closely with the County of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors, the United States government, and law enforcement officials, our dedication to assisting global policing partners is illustrated. We unite our
counterterrorism efforts by better equipping our policing partners, while building bonds of mutual respect.


International Policing Interaction Abroad:

Sheriff Baca Addresses Hate Crime Conference in Moscow, Russia


Sheriff Lee Baca was invited to address an international conference entitled “Building Civil Society in Russia,” which was held in Moscow, Russia in 2005. The conference addressed the role of courts, law enforcement, prosecutors and citizens in building a civil society and combating hate crimes in Russia and  Hungary in 2002 and 2009 respectively.
 

The Sheriff was invited to travel to Hungary by Dr. Krisztina Berta to meet with experts at the Ministry of the Interior, National Police Headquarters and Immigration and Citizenship Office, delegation including Chief of Budapest Police Brigadier General Dr. Gabor Toth visited Sheriff Baca. In 2009, a Hungarian Police delegation visited Sheriff Baca and the LASD in Los Angeles County to continue the ongoing exchange of ideas.


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LASD - Sheriff’s Headquarters Bureau International Liaison Unit


The International Liaison Unit of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department fosters a spirit of cultural exchange. By offering support to consulates in the area, arranging meetings between Sheriff Baca and foreign delegates, coordinating tours of LASD facilities, and attending cultural functions, the International Liaison Unit fortifies ties with the international community and shares best practices. This exchange increases the LASD’s understanding of the global community we serve in Los Angeles County.


International Liaison Unit Mission Statement

The Los Angeles County Sheriff´s Department is a lead agency in the United States´ interaction with international law enforcement.  Through the exchange of policies and cultures, the International Liaison Unit of Sheriff´s Headquarters Bureau enhances global law enforcement practices and thus, helps the LASD become a meaningful participant in an increasingly globalized world.                        

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Global Visits


Members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, while participating in a Cultural Exchange Program in China, met with Police Officials from three different regions to discuss matters of interest in providing public safety to our respective communities. A common theme was to ensure the public received respected and quality service from their local police.


Police and Cultural Exchange Program


The Cultural Exchange Program is a voluntary program where Department personnel, including sworn and civilian personnel, journey to other countries at their own expense to acquire a better understanding of the respective countries’ cultures and to learn from various law enforcement organizations. Some of the areas of the world that such outreach has occurred in are:

 

Middle East


Sheriff Baca and sheriff´s personnel visited Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to confer with law enforcement and government officials on subjects including terrorism, an anti-radicalization program, and law enforcement operations and training.


This trip provided an overview of law enforcement programs and operations, including policing of The Hajj, a pilgrimage to Mecca that must be carried out at least once in the lifetime of every able-bodied Muslim who can afford to do so.  This massive event is the largest annual pilgrimage in the world attracting over five million people in a span of just four days.  Even with crowd control techniques, there are still many incidents during the Hajj, as pilgrims are trampled in a crowd, or ramps collapse under the weight of the numerous visitors.  This was a unique opportunity to gain inside knowledge of event security and crowd control techniques of a magnitude unseen in the U.S.

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Asia

 

During an exchange trip to Beijing, sheriff´s department personnel from the International Liaison Unit visited the Chinese People´s Public Security University (Police Academy).  The experience was eye-opening, and a great example of exchange between two metropolitan law enforcement organizations.  Through this shared learning experience, the similarities between the two systems, especially in ethics, weapons training, and physical conditioning were discussed.  Differences appeared in the application of criminal law, emergency vehicle operation, and the trainees´ curriculum.  The LASD Year in Review booklet was presented to the Public Security University.  The booklet explains LASD´s perspective, organizational chart, services, jail system, and community relations.  Like many other global trips, these exchanges are necessary for improvements in law enforcement on an international scale. 
 

Europe

 

The Interpol International Terrorism Conference, ¨Preventing the Emergence of the Next Generation of Terrorists,¨ was held in Lyon, France, in 2007.  This conference resulted from Sheriff Baca´s request to the Director of Interpol, to bring together representatives from nations that have experienced terrorist activities and attacks.  Sheriff Baca was one of the primary presenters and spoke on terrorism and radicalization.  He concentrated his comments on the importance of outreach to the Muslim community for cooperation to fight terrorism.  He described the creation of the Muslim American Homeland Security Congress (MAHSC) by the Los Angeles County Sheriff´s Department as a means to accomplish an effective partnership. 

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CONNECTING WITH THE WORLD

 

Israel

 

Sheriff Baca and department personnel went to the ¨United Against Terror: Law Enforcement in the Era of Global Terror,¨ Israel Police seminar, in Tel Aviv, Israel in 2003.  In 2006 Sheriff Baca also attended the Homeland Security Conference on Terrorism, held by Israel´s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in Jerusalem, Israel.  Several other exchanges with LASD personnel have occurred.

 

Jordan

 

Sheriff Baca and department personnel toured Amman and the surrounding area to meet with law enforcement and government officials to discuss issues of mutual concern and tour recent suicide bombing sites at local hotels.  Possible training for Jordanian police by the LASD was also discussed.  Sheriff Baca also attended an audience with His Royal Highness King Abdulla II.

 

Australia

 

In 2007, Sheriff Baca and department personnel attended the Leadership in Counter Terrorism (LinCT) Pacific Program, sponsored by the FBI and the Australian Institute of Police Management (AIPM), in Manly, Australia; Los Angeles, CA; Quantico, VA.  This program focused on joint counter terrorism efforts and new ideas between the different agencies. 
 

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Pakistan

 

The Sheriff and selected Sheriff´s Department personnel took part in a Delegation to Pakistan to tour the country and meet with law enforcement and governmental officials.  Common issues such as counterterrorism efforts and local law enforcement practices were discussed.  Sheriff Baca and personnel attended an audience with President Pervez Musharraf and toured the cities of Lahore, Islamabad, Peshawar and the Khyber Region along the border of Pakistan and Afghanistan.  

 

Qatar

 

Sheriff’s Department personnel accompanied Sheriff Baca on visits to Qatar to met with law enforcement and government officials to discuss areas of mutual concern.  This included the International Association of Chiefs of Police IACP/MILIPOL International Conference on Terrorism Technology in 2008. In addition to an audience with Prime Minister Al Thani, visits included discussions on emergency management, law enforcement training exchange programs, and the proposed initiation of an International Conference on ¨Professional Diplomacy¨ which is scheduled to be held in Los Angeles in 2009.

 

Canada

 

Sheriff Baca and former Canadian Consul General from Los Angeles (Alain Dudoit) visited local and national law enforcement and government officials in the cities of Ottawa and Vancouver.  This visit allowed both countries to share law enforcement ideas and discuss techniques for advancement.  Later visits to British Columbia have included topics such as education, leadership, homelessness and media relations. 

 

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Law Enforcement Participation

 

What is the difference between Police and Sheriff’s Departments?

 

A review of United States history will help answer this question. The founders of the United States strongly believed in decentralized, local control whenever possible. Americans continue to believe in local control, especially with regards to the law enforcement officers who protect them.

 

The United States does not have a national police force. Instead, there are thousands of police and sheriff’s departments across the U.S. While there are differences in policing among the 50 U.S. states and counties, California’s policing system is common.

 

The state of California is divided into 58 counties. The residents of each county elect a Sheriff to be the chief law enforcement officer of their county. The Sheriff and sheriff’s deputies are in charge of the jails and courts, and are the sole policing force for the county areas that are not in a city. Once a community incorporates and becomes a city, the city can either employ their own appointed police chief and police officers to patrol the city, or they can contract with the sheriff’s department of their county to be their
police department.

 

Sheriff’s deputies and police officers have police powers throughout the entire state. State police have state jurisdiction including over state highways, and federal agents enforce federal laws.

 

About the LASD

 

Led by Sheriff Leroy D. Baca, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department is the largest sheriff’s department and third largest policing agency in the United States. It is the largest contract policing agency and the second largest transit police force in the country. The LASD manages the nation’s biggest county jail system (nearly 20,000 inmates) and the largest court security operation (600 bench officers and 48 Superior Courts).

 

Over four million people are directly protected by the LASD in over 3,100 of the 4,013 square miles of Los Angeles County. This includes 40 incorporated cities, 90 unincorporated communities, nine community colleges, and over a million daily commuters of the buses and trains of the Los Angeles Metro and six-county Metrolink trains. The LASD includes over 10,000 budgeted sworn and 8,000 civilian personnel, as well as over 830 reserve sheriff’s deputies, 420 youth explorers, and over 4,000 civilian volunteers.
 

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Pearls in Policing Conferences

 

The Pearls in Policing conferences brings together approximately 30 senior police officers from all over the world who have excelled in their field. As a group they look for ways in which police and other law enforcement agencies can constantly react to modern challenges on every level, from local neighborhood problems to worldwide issues. Pearls in Policing participants are nominated by the Curatorium on the recommendation of the Board of International Advisors. They are personally invited, based on their professional experience and leadership qualities. Sheriff Lee Baca has been honored with invitations to attend. The objective is to always find a good balance between senior police officers at the federal, national, and local levels and the heads of international law enforcement agencies. A discussion paper is drafted annually to facilitate the various discussions. This paper is based on academic literature, the experiences of the members of the Curatorium, and the experiences of the International Pearl Fishers Action Learning Group.

 

Law Enforcement Attachés Website

 

A website was developed to enhance communication between international law enforcement attachés and local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. It connects attachés and their U.S. counterparts via a private, real-time law enforcement directory for officers engaged in matters relating to homeland security and international law enforcement. With a few clicks, foreign attachés can quickly locate office telephone, mobile phone and email contact information.

 

It also contains timely and accurate contact information, robust functions including internal email capability, a forum/bulletin board, and an electronic evite system. This site was developed by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. It represents an important use of technology to improve and strengthen the relationships between International law enforcement agencies with the greater goal of achieving world peace and mutual trust among the peoples of all nations.

 

Major Crimes Bureau (HALT) - Health Authority Law Enforcement Task Force

 

The Health Authority Law Enforcement Task Force (HALT) is a multi-jurisdictional, multi-agency unit funded and managed by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services and the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Major Crimes Bureau. The HALT Task Force works with several local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies, and private industry investigators that explore crimes which threaten public health and safety.

 

Globally, HALT deals with different issues in different countries. Organized crime groups from Russia, Armenia, Nigeria and the Philippines are the most common organized crime groups associated with health care fraud. Criminals from Middle Eastern countries are also prevalent in these crime groups. The task force mainly deals with stolen health care funds, smuggled pharmaceuticals, and counterfeit drugs and money.
 

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Joint Regional Intelligence Center (JRIC)

 

The Joint Regional Intelligence Center is a cooperative venture between the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Los Angeles Police Department, and the Los Angeles Terrorism Early Warning (TEW) group. JRIC establishes a center for the accumulation, analysis, and dissemination of all terrorist related information to assist in the fight against terrorism. It is a fusion center for the sharing of information between local, state, and federal agencies in a special
facility that is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Terrorism is a national and global battle. With the partnership of these highly regarded law enforcement agencies, we are another step closer to stopping terrorism.

 

LASD-64TH Interpol Liaison Office 

 

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department has been designated the official point of contact for INTERPOL matters within Los Angeles County. This new designation applies to all areas within the county, except the city of Los Angeles.

 

In order to combat the increasing globalization of crime, it is crucial for the United States’ state and local police authorities to be able to communicate with, and access information from, their international counterparts. The communication network and database resources of INTERPOL, the International Criminal Police Organization, are ideally suited for this purpose. To address this need, the U.S. National Central Bureau of INTERPOL, the United States’ official representative to INTERPOL and a component of the U.S. Department of Justice, in coordination with state and local authorities, has established “INTERPOL Liaison Offices”. The LASD became the 64th U.S. law enforcement agency designated to meet this need, joining existing offices in each of the 50 states, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Boston, New York, Chicago, the city of Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Miami-Dade County, Houston, San Diego, San Francisco, and Seattle.
 

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Los Angeles Terrorism Early Warning

 

In 2008, Sheriff Baca commissioned a book recounting the groundbreaking experiences and conceptual framework of the Los Angeles Terrorism Early Warning (TEW) Group. The resulting publication, Terrorism Early Warning: 10 Years of Achievement in Fighting Terrorism and Crime contains a foreword by Sheriff Lee Baca, as well as essays from an international team of scholars and practitioners. The book looks at the convergence of terrorism and crime and provides a detailed overview of the history, evolution, and operational concepts developed by the TEW. The Los Angeles TEW was established by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department in 1996 to perform interagency, multidisciplinary analysis of terrorism and emerging threats. As such, it was the forerunner to the emerging national network of fusion centers.

 

The goal of the book was to document the analytical processes that evolved after a decade of experience in counterterrorism intelligence operations within the LA TEW, and establish a framework for sharing these analytical techniques with law enforcement organizations worldwide. The book is available on-line at the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department website at www.lasd.org.

 

Public Trust Policing

 

Public trust policing is the use of police resources in a manner that includes the public’s participation in the mission of public safety.

 

The purpose of public trust policing is to provide a higher level of public safety. It is incumbent upon law enforcement to recognize that without the full faith and cooperation of the public, the mission of public safety is severely impaired.

 

The process of public trust policing involves moving from what was generally known as a closed system to an inclusive and open system of public participation in the public safety mission.
 

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LASD Transparency

 

 

Independent Oversight

 

Public trust policing is the key instrument for engaging the public to believe in their police or sheriff’s department. Beyond the need for good, respectful communication between the public and the police is the need for transparency when things go wrong.

 

Typically, when misconduct occurs, the law enforcement agency investigates itself without any outside assistance. While an internal investigation can be done with great accuracy, in this age of media analysis and influence, public opinion may still be led in the direction of greater mistrust of the police service.

 

The Office of Independent Review (OIR) was created to build trust. The OIR monitors all criminal and internal affairs investigations from start to finish and publishes its results on the internet. Its goal is to ensure accuracy, objectivity, fairness and compliance with the disciplinary standards of the Sheriff’s Department.

 

The OIR is staffed by six civil rights attorneys. For over seven years, this independent office has ensured that all incidents, big or small, are investigated properly, reported accurately, and that policy and management are improved when necessary.

 

An independent Los Angeles County Ombudsman also responds to the public’s complaints regarding the quality or status of any complaint about LASD employees. This review process ensures that all public-initiated grievances are heard and explained to the public to the fullest extent possible.

 

LASD Inmate Information Center (IIC) on the Internet

 

Arrest and jail location information is available to concerned family members globally on the Internet through the Sheriff’s Department Inmate Information Center (IIC) at www.lasd.org. Persons arrested by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, the Los Angeles Police Department, and the over 50 municipal and specialized police agencies in Los Angeles County are posted onto the Los Angeles County Automated Jail Information System (AJIS). The IIC contains legally available public information including name, booking number, birth date, bail amount, and court date.

 

West Hollywood Russian Cultural Program

 

The city of West Hollywood is known to people worldwide as a center for cultural diversity coupled with an eclectic nightlife. Among the city’s residential population, the largest cultures represented are immigrants from the south Caucasus area near Eastern Europe/ Western Asia. Almost one third of the people who live, work or play in West Hollywood are immigrants from countries including Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.

 

Because of a mistrust of police that developed in their home countries, few immigrants were willing to report crimes. LASD West Hollywood Sheriff’s Station deputies and outreach workers from West Hollywood City Hall educate the immigrant community with the customs and laws of the U.S., thereby building trust and empowerment.

 

SHARE (Stop Hate and Respect Everyone) Tolerance Program

 

The mission of the LASD “SHARE Tolerance” program is to promote change in attitudes about hate and intolerance, and to encourage respect and tolerance.

 

The program capitalizes on the leadership skills and authoritative community standing of uniformed LASD sheriff’s deputies. Deputies make presentations, lead discussions, and inspire thought and action about the importance of tolerance, and the value of diversity in Los Angeles County and in society in general. “SHARE Tolerance” attempts to instill in the community the same principles cited in the Department’s Core Values: respect, integrity, wisdom, common sense, fairness, and courage.
 

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LASD Education

 

Train and Support All Department Employees to be Leaders

 

A major goal of public trust policing is to reduce or eliminate police misconduct.  Inappropriate behavior by police reduces public trust, particularly in high-crime areas.  Encouraging all ranks of police officers to incorporate leadership skills into their lives will lead to stronger, more defined ethics.  A leadership academy with a comprehensive curriculum for all employees is one of the best methods with which to solidify individual integrity and personal and professional growth.  The LASD Deputy Leadership Institute (DLI) was created by Sheriff Lee Baca in 1999 to achieve these goals.

 

Education Leads to Leadership

 

Policing in the 21st Century requires today’s law enforcement official to be a versatile thinker, performer and citizen. This primary reality is driven by the complexity of modern society and the complicated issues crime creates. There is no single solution to solving today’s crime problems. The only factor that is constant is that human beings will always be involved, either as a victim or perpetrator. Education is the cornerstone in successfully responding to the multi-faceted, intricate demands of modern public safety.
The Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department University (LASDU) is a consortium of dozens of colleges and universities whose mission is to provide LASD employees and local police officers with accessible, multi-varied learning programs that will enhance personal and professional growth, promote a lifelong commitment to learning, and enable all employees to better serve their community. Over one thousand peace officers have earned or are earning degrees.
 

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Police Diplomacy Involves Training

 

Police diplomacy sometimes requires physical training as seen in the rappelling exercise where LASD sheriff´s deputies cross trained with Saudi Arabian law enforcement.

 

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Public Participation

 

(CLEPP) Community Law Enforcement Partnership Program

 

This office organizes community groups and programs to fight gangs, drugs and violence, in addition to providing support to stations through the Volunteers on Patrol program. Over 4,000 volunteers assist in planning and executing special events, such as sheriff´s station grand openings, town hall meetings and Neighborhood Watch meetings. 

 

Community Advisory Committees

 

These councils act as liaisons between sheriff’s stations and the communities they serve, consisting of members selected to best represent the diversity of the area. They provide direct input from the public regarding local issues and assist in the development of programs suited to their communities.
 

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Interfaith Advisory Council

 

Comprised of clergy and religious leaders, this group aims to raise the level of communication between the Sheriff´s Department and citizens and improve communities´ quality of life by addressing important issues and concerns.  It also assists with spiritual guidance during crisis situations.

 

Ethnic Advisory Councils Hearing from the community

 

In order to remain connected to the many diverse cultures which exist in Los Angeles County, Sheriff Baca instituted The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Advisory Councils. These groups are made up primarily of ethnic groups, and meet with the Sheriff regularly. They keep the Sheriff advised of issues which affect their communities, and assist the Sheriff in being sensitive to their unique customs and beliefs, which might affect their interaction with deputies. It is through this connectivity that the employees
of the Sheriff’s Department are able to treat these various groups with dignity and respect, while providing the highest level of service possible.

 

Volunteers

 

Volunteers of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department perform critical services at each of the stations throughout the county. These duties greatly advance the goals of this Department, raise the level of service to the community, and give the volunteer a great deal of personal satisfaction. These thousands of citizens are the eyes and ears of the Sheriff’s Department in the community. They volunteer to perform nonhazardous patrol duties, including traffic control, searching for missing children and conducting residential vacation checks.
 

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Community Services Center Rowland Heights

 

In association with Asian community groups, the Walnut /Diamond Bar Sheriff’s Station opened a store front community service center in the Rowland Heights Service Center. The majority of community residents are Korean and Chinese, and the center is staffed with interpreters who speak Cantonese, Korean and Spanish. The center is operated by Station volunteers five days a week and is a valuable resource for the community. The purpose of this program is to build trust and friendship between the Sheriff’s Department and all community members. The center especially helps bridge understanding between foreign language speaking residents and law enforcement.

 

Operation Safe Community Working Together for the Good of All

 

Operation Safe Community (OSC) was organized in 1990 as a community response to the alarming growth of issues related to at-risk youth. There are numerous programs within the Sheriff’s Department such as the Youth Activities League (YAL), Vital Intervention Directional Alternatives (VIDA), and Success Through Awareness and Resistance (STAR). These programs are dedicated to bridging cultural gaps and reconnecting with youth through various community activities. Los Angeles County youth are provided a safe, supportive haven where they can interact with positive role models, including law enforcement officers, and receive life guidance, factual information, educational tutoring, and participate in after-school and self esteem-building activities. These programs have a direct and positive impact for the individuals involved and for the community. 

 

Community Academies

 

This program is specifically designed to educate community members on law enforcement’s role. For 13 weeks, participants attend classes that focus on topics such as criminal law, firearms, internal investigations, patrol procedures and gang enforcement. They also observe deputies on patrol and tour the Weapons Training Center, Emergency Operations Bureau and a Sheriff’s jail facility.
 

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The number one issue regarding 21st century policing is not superior technology, radio care efficiency, not command and control, all of which are important; It is simply the point of public trust.
- Sheriff Lee Baca

 

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Countries and Communities Connecting in a Global Partnership

6.7 billion people World Population


The Languages and Cultural
 

Diversity of the LASD

 

One out of three people who live in Los Angeles County were born outside the United States, and over 50% of households speak a language other than English.  The sheriff´s deputies, civilians and volunteers of the Los Angeles County Sheriff´s Department (LASD) reflect the diversity of the communities we serve.  At least 58 different languages are spoken by the culturally diverse personnel of the LASD, including over 80% of the national languages of the 114 foreign consulates serving the residents of Los Angeles County.

 

Afghani, Arabic, Amenian, Assyrian, Azeri, Bengali, Cambodian, Cantonese, Cebuano Bisaya, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, Ethiopian, Farsi, French, German, Greek, Gujarati, Hakka, Hausa, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Igbo, Indonesian, Italian, Jamaican Patois, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Lithuanian, Llocano, Malay, Mandarin, Nepali, Norwegian, Pangasinan, Polish, Portuguese, Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Samoan, Sign Language, Sinhala, Somali, Spanish, Swedish, Tagalog, Telegu, Thai, Turkish, Tzeltal, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese, Yoruba

Inside Front Cover
The Languages and Cultural

 

 

Diversity of the LASD
 

The Diversity in the Los Angeles County Sheriff´s Department,  County of Los Angeles, State of California and United States, Reflects the World United States of America


Total Population:............................................................................................................................ 298,757,000
Total Foreign Born Population:.................................................................................................... 37,234,000 
  Africa:........................................................................................................................................... 1,360,000
  Asia:.............................................................................................................................................. 9,941,000
  Europe:......................................................................................................................................... 4,996,000
  Latin America:............................................................................................................................. 19,891,000
  Oceania:....................................................................................................................................... 197,000


California

Total Population:............................................................................................................................ 36,264,000
Total Foreign Born Population:....................................................................................................  9,865,000 
  Africa:............................................................................................................................................ 144,000
  Asia:.............................................................................................................................................. 3,342,000
  Europe:.......................................................................................................................................... 684,000
  Latin America:.............................................................................................................................. 5,488,000
  Oceania:........................................................................................................................................ 72,000


Los Angeles County:

Total Population:............................................................................................................................ 10,347,000
Total Foreign Born Population:....................................................................................................  3,537,000 
  Africa:............................................................................................................................................ 48,000
  Asia:.............................................................................................................................................. 1,115,000
  Europe:.......................................................................................................................................... 184,000
  Latin America:.............................................................................................................................. 2,148,000
  Oceania:........................................................................................................................................ 12,000


*Sources:  U.S. Census Bureau 2005-2007 American Community Survey 3 yr estimates and California Department of Finance 2008 estimates


Police Diplomacy Countries So Far


The following is a list of countries and governing bodies that LASD employees have hosted or visited through official meetings, training, and exchanges of law enforcement procedures and cultures in recent years:


Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, China, El Salvador, France, Germany, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Panama, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka,Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom, Vietnam


Inside Back Cover
 




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